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Central Statistics Office P45 Data Breach Caused by Human Error

The Central Statistics Office has admitted to a data breach involving an error by a staff member, leading to a sever breach of data protection rules. Reports were made last week that a past employee for the CSO has been sent P45s of other past and present employees in error. The past employee was outraged at the time, as she believed that 1000 people’s records had been breached.

The CSO has since issued a “sincere apology” for the incident, and volunteered that the incident had not affected 1000 people, but had actually concerned 3000 former employees.


The Central Statistics Office has apologised for a staff error which sent 3000 P45s to a past employee – a catastrophic data breach

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Shane Chambers No Comments

Uber: How Not to Handle a Data Breach

Uber is back in the hot water again after it has revealed that over 57 million records were exposed in a 2016 data breach, which it subsequently covered up. This news comes not long after Uber ousted founder and CEO Travis Kalanick, who was suceeded in August by Dara Khosrowshahi. Kalanick was forced out of his own company due to a litany of scandals, and now Khosrowshahi is keen to do things the right way – hence the fresh statement declaring the breach. However, this has put Uber into a very troubling situation as not only do they face legal action for covering up a data breach, but it has also revealed an incredibly poor security culture within the company.


Uber will already be subject to regular external data audits for the next 20 years due to a previous, much smaller data breach

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Shane Chambers 1 Comment

Cyber Security Is Not Just for IT – It’s for Everyone

Traditionally, cyber security has been seen as an IT department’s problem. They make sure everyone has antivirus on their PCs and take care of the firewall – and as long as they’re doing it right, then everyone else is safe… right? This has lulled users and business owners into a false sense of security of late, believing that cyber security simply isn’t their area or that it’s not in their job description. However, this attitude is now being taken advantage of in a big way by cyber criminals, who have discovered that individual users are much easier to target and deceive. As a result, users often takes actions which inadvertently allows the hackers to bypass the IT security systems. Traditional antivirus is dead, and even more advanced next-generation antivirus simply can’t stop the most deadly attacks. Now, everyone in an organisation has a part to play in keeping it secure, from the bottom all the way up to the CEO.


Hackers are now finding it easier to target regular users, who often lack cyber security training, than to try and bypass complex technical measures put in place by IT

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Companies Continue to Cover up Data Breaches Despite Imminent Fine Increase Under GDPR

Recently, car insurance and breakdown cover provider AA faced accusations of covering up the severity of a data breach that occurred in April of this year. The AA, through their customer support Twitter, chose to downplay reports of the breach and assured users that no credit card or other sensitive data had been exposed. Data was leaked from their online shop due to a server misconfiguration. However, this server contained data on over 100,000 AA customers, and included partial credit card data. Despite knowing about this breach for over two months, it wasn’t until the cyber security community cried out in outrage that AA eventually admitted to the severity of the breach. No customers were notified by the AA directly.


No customers that were impacted were directly notified by the AA, despite the breach being discovered in April.

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Cyber Essentials Accreditor Suffer Data Breach, Exposes Companies to Phishing Attacks

For those of you who may not have heard of the Cyber Essentials scheme, it is an accreditation-based program created by the UK government and backed by the industry in both the UK and Ireland, to show that basic cyber security measures have been put in place that will block most cyber attacks. It was designed as an affordable alternative to ISO27001, which may be financially out-of-reach for many small/medium enterprises, and is a requirement for any businesses that deal with the UK government. So, it may have come as a surprise to many to find out that the IASME Consortium, one of six accrediting bodies in the UK, has suffered a data breach which exposed the company names and email addresses of their applicants. While no other information such as these companies’ security configurations were leaked, the breach could well open the exposed companies to phishing attacks from cyber criminals.


A list of Cyber Essentials applicants, including their company names and corporate email addresses, may have been leaked to hackers.

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