Shane Chambers No Comments

DHL Phishing Campaign Found to Contain New Strain of Malware

Every year, the number of phishing scams seems to be increasing, with the malware-ridden emails getting continually more sophisticated and convincing. The latest global phishing campaign purporting to be from international courier giants DHL has been tricking users into opening a fake PDF attachment – and subsequently unleashed a previously unseen piece of malware to wreak havoc on their PCs.

Cyber criminals are taking advantage of DHL’s worldwide reputation and brand recognition in order to distribute a previously unseen strain of malware, named Muncy. Once the user downloads the fake PDF attachment, the trojan sneaks onto their PC and begins scanning the C:/ drive for any files containing sensitive data.

Once it has completed its scan, it then sends back any data found to the criminals’ server, where they can attempt to steal the user’s money, impersonate them to commit identity fraud, or even request a ransom from them to not release the data publicly.

So how do I recognise this email if I get it? Well, the first question you should ask yourself if you receive a mail from DHL is if you’re expecting a parcel from them. Getting a parcel delivery notice when you’re not expecting any deliveries is always a sign that the email may not be genuine.

For this scam in particular, they have taken advantage of some of DHL’s mail servers to make the emails appear as if they are coming from [email protected](.)com, so they can look quite genuine. The subject of the email is reported to be ‘DHL SHIPMENT NOTIFICATION’, although this may be subject to change if people start to catch on.

The most important thing to bear in mind is to never open links or download attachments in emails that you suspect are not genuine. Most companies like DHL will instead email you a tracking number that you can independently put into their website to see where your delivery is, not send you a PDF out of the blue. Almost any attachment can be dangerous (.txt files are usually safe, but even these have been exploited to contain malware now). That means not just .exe files can execute themselves on your PC and install malware.

If in doubt, throw it out. Be sure to always think before you click anything in an email. If someone, even a trusted friend or colleague, sends you an email asking you to do something you wouldn’t normally, confirm with them over the phone (not text) or in person before you take any actions.

Phishing scams are getting increasingly sophisticated and common, fooling the filters of consumer-based email providers such as Gmail and Hotmail, and even slinking past corporate providers such as Office365 and some advanced email filtering solutions.

For businesses, we would strongly advise cyber security awareness training be provided to all staff as a key tenet of your security practices – doing so can be the difference between avoiding a cyber attack and being the subject of a costly data breach and GDPR fine.

Shane Chambers No Comments

Irish Businesses and Consumers Targeted by Extortion Email Scam

It’s 2018, and phishing emails are just an expected part of life for email users around the world, containing all manner of malware within concealed links and dodgy attachments. Most of us can recognise poorly spelled phishing emails that lack any real context, but what happens when something more complex hits your inbox? What if a cyber criminal emailed you your password – a real password you’ve used – and told you that they had compromising videos of you and more? What if they said that unless you pay a Bitcoin ransom, they would share this incriminating footage with everyone on your contacts list? That’s exactly what has been happening to thousands of Irish users, to both personal and corporate email addresses.


Cyber criminals are ever trying to find newer, more sophisticated means to scam the general public and businesses through phishing

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Shane Chambers No Comments

Enterprise Resource Planning Applications Next Big Cyber Attack Target

Cyber criminals are beginning to target Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) applications, with the aim of disrupting and stealing data from large companies, according to reports from both security experts and the US government. According to a recent report from security companies Digital Shadows and Onapsis, hacktivists and state-sponsored groups in particular and looking to exploit flaws in platforms provided by Oracle and SAP.


SAP and Oracle are believed to be the biggest targets due to long-running security vulnerabilities

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Shane Chambers No Comments

How the Latest Zero-Day Flash Bug Bypasses Your Antivirus and Firewall

Adobe has been forced to release an out-of-schedule emergency security patch to its users, after a zero-day vulnerability was discovered to affect Adobe Flash Player. Users are being urged by Adobe to update to version 30.0.0.113 of Flash Player, which contains mitigations for the zero-day as well as addressing three other flaws. This latest flaw was discovered already being used in the wild to attack Windows users, and doesn’t exploit browsers like typical Flash exploits – instead, it works through Microsoft Office documents which it utilises to download and execute malicious code.


Most Flash exploits take advantage of web browsers, however this zero-day utilises Office documents and is usually received through phishing emails

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